The Health News Review

healthnewsreviewlogoWhen headlines risk misinforming the public, the Health News Review acts as a valuable resource, parsing out the story behind the sound bite. The website’s team of reviewers tackle news stories and news releases, run a blog that evaluates the media’s portrayal of various health related headlines, and even offer toolkits to help readers become informed consumers of health news (and to help journalists become better purveyors of public health information!).


The writers of the site recognize that certain topics (stem cell research, genetics and biotech) tend to be sensationalized by the media, and that medical research is often far more complex than its depiction in a popular news outlet. As a result, consumers of health information are often left relying on simplified information that leaves out crucial details. Articles like “7 Words (and more) You Shouldn’t Use in Medical News” and “Tips for Understanding Studies” seek to inform all involved in health news, from its creation to its consumption.

The site seeks to “improve public dialogue about health care by helping consumers critically analyze claims about health care interventions and by promoting the principles of shared decision-making reinforced by accurate, balanced and complete information about the tradeoffs involved in health care decisions.” The content of the Health News Review allows us to demand more from medical news in general, as well as to deepen the patient-doctor dialogue of the day-to-day.

A Resource for Coloradans in Crisis

coloradocrisisserviceslogoIn our ongoing effort to promote health literacy, Library & Knowledge Services invites you to learn about Colorado Crisis Services, “Colorado’s first statewide resource for mental health, substance use or emotional crisis help, information and referrals.”coloradocrisisservicescoloradocrisisservicestalkColorado Crisis Services offers various levels of support for individuals dealing with mental health, substance use, or emotional issues. The support is confidential; the public can access a crisis support line or visit one of several walk-in centers/stabilization units located throughout Colorado, including the Western Slope. Help is available for non-English speakers as well. The services are open to all, and no one is turned away for inability to pay.

Colorado Crisis Services’ mental health professionals can also provide referrals for mobile care, sending help to those who can’t make it to a center. Respite care may be available for those needing continued assistance for 1-14 days, as determined after an in-person meeting by a Crisis Services Clinician. Those in need can call 1-844-493-8255, text TALK to 38255, or chat with a Crisis Services Clinician through the website:


June Newsletter

In our June Library & Knowledge Services newsletter, we show you how to use ClinicalKey to  create dynamic presentations and how to search our subscription database, Natural Medicines. You’ll also find a highlight of National Jewish Health’s collaborative research efforts on scleroderma, and a look at why information from WebMD should be treated with caution.

Read the June newsletter.